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The Nexus Between Carbon Emission, Energy Consumption, Economic Growth And Changing Economic Structure In India: A Multivariate Cointegration Approach

Chandrima Sikdar and Kakali Mukhopadhyay

 India, one of the fastest growing economies of the world is also one of the largest CO2 emitters in the world. Challenge before the country is to reduce this alarming emission levels without hindering its growth prospects. Against this backdrop, the present paper studies the dynamic causal relationships between India’s CO2 emission, energy consumption, GDP growth and changing economic structure. The study uses cointegration and causality analysis for the same. ARDL bound testing approach along with Johansen-Juselius maximum likelihood procedure is applied to examine the existence of long run equilibrium relationship among the variables. Causal linkages between the variables are studied using Granger causality test in Vector Error Correction model framework. For this the study uses data on India for-CO2 emissions, primary energy consumption, GDP per capita and structural variables like, agriculture and service value added, urbanization, production of capital and intermediate goods and employment. Primary energy consumption, per capita GDP and trade openness explain variations in CO2 emissions over long run. Elasticity of CO2 emission with respect to energy consumption is 2 percent in long run and 1.8 per cent in short run. CO2 emissions are less responsive to changes in per capita GDP (0.52) and trade openness (0.10). Both trade openness and GDP per capita growth lower emissions by producing and exporting more labor-intensive environment friendly goods. Causality analysis shows that trade openness Granger causes CO2 emission both in short run and in long run while CO2 emission Granger causes service value added and production of capital and intermediate goods in the short run. Output in these sectors in turn Granger cause employment in the long run. Given the nature of causality, there is no way that India can reduce energy consumption in service sector or in capital and intermediate goods sector. Thus, faced with growing concern over rising emission levels and requirements to meet its growth potentials, India should take policies aiming at greater investment in and usage of cleaner energy, conservation of energy and improving energy efficiency. This way it can strike a balance between reducing its emission levels while maintaining its current growth momentum.
Courtesy: Project muse
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E-service quality, consumer satisfaction and future purchase intentions in e-retail

Prateek Kalia , Richa Arora (bi), and Sibongiseni Kumalo

e-Service Journal , Volume 10, Number 1, Fall 2016

There has been dramatic increase in online consumer base throughout the World and technology adoption by masses has fueled the success of e-commerce players. One of the fastest growing segments of e-commerce is online retail. E-retailers are deploying large chunks of their investments to build and hold their positions in the competitive markets. Therefore service quality and factors’ affecting online buying behavior has become conspicuous field of study. This paper examines the above mentioned topic in Indian e-retail context. With an aim to understand associations between service quality, consumer satisfaction and future purchase intentions, web survey has been applied to 308 respondents, who have made at least one online purchase in past six months from any of the four most popular e-retailers in India. Relationship has been found between online service quality and future purchase intentions; furthermore this study confirmed that online consumer satisfaction act as mediator between online service quality and future purchase intentions.

URL: https://muse.jhu.edu/article/650681

Courtesy: Project Muse

SEMINAR, 701 January 2018

Contents

INDIA 2017 a symposium on the year that was

INDIA UNDER MODI by T.N. Ninan

FRATERNITY IN THE MAKING OF THE INDIAN NATION by Devesh Kapur

ARTICLES OF FAITH by Seema Chishti

THE ECONOMY: AN ANNUS HORRIBILIS by C. Rammanohar Reddy

SHINING INDIA’S SUFFERING UNDERBELLY by K.P. Kannan

FARM CRISIS REDUX by Harish Damodaran

WOOING THE FARMER by Ashok Gulati and Ranjana Roy

LAKPA’S FUTURE by Suman Bhattacharjea

LITERALLY A LIFE OR DEATH POLICY by Mihir S. Sharma

MODI’S FOREIGN POLICY: NO BETTER AND NO WORSE THAN PREDECESSORS by Kanti Bajpai

REMAPPING INDIA’S GEOPOLITICS  by C. Raja Mohan

INDIA-CHINA: A ZERO-SUM RIVALRY? by Srinath Raghavan

CYBER (IN)SECURITY by Samir Saran

AMBEDKAR’S SOCIALISM: SOME REFLECTIONS  by Anand Teltumbde

THE STORY OF A SIKH MUSEUM by Kanika Singh

FATE OF THE REFUGEE: THE SHIP OF FOOLS by Shiv Visvanathan

BACKPAGE

INDEX
Index of all published issues from 1959 to 2016 and interactive index of all articles and issues of 2017

Impact of Economic Growth on Social Development Dimensions in India: A State-Level Analysis

Surajit Deb

CSD Working Paper 2017

India’s performance on various social development indicators remains poor due to prevalence of extreme
poverty that has often caused deprivations in the form of hunger, malnutrition, illiteracy, poor basic
amenities and social exclusion. This study provides consistent measures of social development across 29
state economies of the country during two trienniums ending in 2002-03 and 2012-13. The aggregate
index covering 21 indicators within six dimensions of social development namely, demographic,
health, education, basic amenities, social and economic, as well as the dimensional indices, allows us
to rank the states according to social progress in each triennium. We subsequently explore whether
economic growth had an equal impact on different dimensions of social development in the country. The
relationship between economic growth and statistical scores of social development dimensions has been
examined at the level of individual states through elasticity analysis and also in terms of an aggregative
analysis involving the 29 states in a cross-sectional regression framework. Our findings signify that
while per capita Net State Domestic Product (NSDP) improved universally for the 29 states in the interim
period of the two trienniums, the performance relating to various dimensions of social development
was at variance. The cross-sectional results involving the 29 states indicate that there is a strong
positive, though non-linear, relation between per capita real NSDP and the various dimensional scores
of social development. Thus, while small increases in per capita real NSDP are associated with large
progress in social developments in states with low per capita incomes, the gains in social development
emerging from economic growth diminishes as states reach high levels of income. Our results also imply
that every single dimension of social development bears a distinct relationship with economic growth.
Finally, analyses of the growth (income) elasticity of social development in each dimension reveal that
the achievements of translation from economic growth to social development have been mixed across
states and dimensions. Our results suggest that while economic growth expanded the choices in the
dimension of basic amenities, the achievements in educational dimension remained inadequate in India.

URL: http://csdindia.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/Working-Paper-Impact-of-Economic-Growth-on-Social-Development-2017.pdf

Courtesy: CSD

Productivity : A Quarterly Journal of The National Productivity Council, Volume 58, Issue No.3, October-December 2017

CONTENTS

Role of Infrastructure in Value Addition to Management Education: An Empirical Study (Page: 251-260) by Sistu V.S.N. Murthy and Sunil Kumar

Activity-Based Teaching in Higher Education Institutions (Page: 261-270) by Rupa Rathee and Pallavi Rajain

Internationalization of Higher Education in India: Emerging Trends, Strategies and Policies (Page: 271-279) by Surendra Mani Tripathi and Anjali Bajpai

Excellence in Higher Education: Need of the Hour (Page: 280-285) by J D Singh

Influence of Organizational Justice on Managerial Effectiveness in Institutions of Higher Learning (Page: 286-299) by Navneesh Tyagi, D. Baby Moses and Surekha Rana

Biotechnology Higher Education, Funding & Start-ups: Indian Scenario (Page: 300-307) by Shridhar C. Ghagane, Murigendra B. Hiremath, G. G. Kadadevaru, Sridevi I. Puranik and R. B. Nerli

The Effects of R&D Spending on Productivity Performance: Findings from the Public Sector Enterprises in India (Page: 308-316) by Chinmoy Roy

Public Debt and its Sustainability at State Level: A Study of Kerala (Page: 317-330) by V. Nagarajan Naidu

Application of Lean Principles in Indian Service Sector: Exploratory Analysis (Page: 321-339) by M. D. Vadhvani and M. G. Bhatt

Managing Common Property Resources (CPRs) for Rural Development : A Development Perspective (Page: 340-351) by M. Sabesh Manikandan and K. Sundaram

Data Base- Higher Education: India vis-à-vis Select Countries (Page: 352-354) by Rajesh Sund

URL: http://www.printspublications.com/journal/productivityaquarterlyjournalofthenationalproductivitycouncil668022169472596307

Courtesy: Prints Publications

Land Acquisition in Contemporary India: The Growth Agenda, Legislation and Resistance

Indian Journal of Public Administration, vol. 63, 1, 2017

Land acquisition legislation in India has been a subject of public debate since Independence. Guided by the socialist pattern of economy, the government initiated land reforms in India but could only partially achieve this objective due to political stronghold of landed class in rural areas. Land was, however, acquired for building dams, mines and infrastructure. Such developmental initiatives were justified as steps being taken to achieve rapid economic development necessary for public welfare in the longer run. Also, there was little resistance to land acquisition as the level of political consciousness was low and there were few unorganised political organisations to channel the voices. In the post-liberalisation period, land acquisition legislations resulted from the thrust for commercialisation and fast track industrial investments. The new model of growth based on relentless competition implicit in a market economy created immense opportunities for the expansion of private business. Pro-business governments found it imperative to make prominent changes in the existing laws to smoothen the process of landacquisition. But, such measures have faced challenges on public platforms. Resistance to landacquisition is far more organised and powerful than what it was in the past. The article studies the politics of land acquisition in the light of recent steps taken by the pro-business governments to amend land laws and the resistance faced at both institutional and societal levels.

URL: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0019556117689851

Courtesy: Sage

Construction of gender sensitive poverty line based on local perception: Evidence from Habra-II Block of West Bengal state in India

RupakGoswami and SaikatMajumdar

The Social Science Journal, Volume 54, Issue 1, March 2017

This study employs participatory well-being ranking (PWBR) exercise with men and women separately for generating gendered poverty line in Habra-II Block of West Bengal state of India. Men and women differ in a number of themes related to the experience of poverty. We quantify the gender disaggregated qualitative information collected through PWBR from eight village segments to arrive at poverty lines, followed by the generation of poverty statistics. Women and men differ in a number of themes related to poverty. Women use land, house type, dependent in the family, occupation and infrastructure to characterize poor households, and men use sanitation, business, land holding, farming, and occupations for the same. The differential gender perception results in different poverty lines and poverty statistics for men and women in most of the study villages. For most of the study villages women generated higher number of below poverty line households than men.

URL: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0362331916300842#!

Courtesy: Sciencedirect

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